Backcountry Magazine 123 - The Homegrown Issue

This issue is all about exploring the depths of your own backyard, wherever that may be. In Vermont, managing editor Lucy Higgins covers the complete history of backcountry skiing in the Green Mountain State—from the 1933 creation of the Civilian Conservation Corps, which created some of the Northeast's most iconic...
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This issue is all about exploring the depths of your own backyard, wherever that may be. In Vermont, managing editor Lucy Higgins covers the complete history of backcountry skiing in the Green Mountain State—from the 1933 creation of the Civilian Conservation Corps, which created some of the Northeast's most iconic ski trails, to the groundbreaking work of today's backcountry alliances. Overseas, Scott Yorko follows French brothers Jean-Baptiste and Jonathan Charlet up and down some of Chamonix's most harrowing lines as the duo adds another chapter to their family's legacy—this time on snowboards. And in far northwestern British Columbia on First Nations Land, Burnie Glacier Chalet serves up lessons deeper than the surrounding powder.


THE HOMEGROWN ISSUE

CONTOURS: VERMONT'S GREEN MOUNTAINS
At the height of the Great Depression in 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed legislation to create the Civilian Conservation Corps, the public works relief program that presented a bottom-up solution to rampant unemployment. It also produced some of the Northeast's most iconic ski trails. Now, Vermont's Green Mountains are undergoing another monumental shift thanks to a boom in government/community partnerships to create state-sanctioned glades, bringing economic opportunities, trail networks and a legal solution to New England's infamous underbrush. This is the story of backcountry skiing in Vermont.

BIG BOOTS TO FILL
For five generations, the name Charlet has echoed throughout the Alps above Chamonix, France—Isabella Charlet-Straton made the first winter ascent of Mont Blanc with her future husband, Jean Charlet, in January 1876; Jean-Esteril Charlet claimed the first ascent of 3,733-meter Petit Dru three years later; and Armand Charlet completed the first winter traverse of Les Drus in 1938 after many firsts on the Aiguille Verte. Charlets have served as guides, perished in avalanches and bestowed their name on icefalls and cols. Today, brothers Jean-Baptiste "Babs" Charlet and Jonathan "Douds" Charlet are following in the family footsteps—just with snowboards on their feet.

DEPOSITION

CONTRIBUTORS

PERSPECTIVE: EARLY RISER

EDITOR'S NOTE: OUT OF THE SHADOWS

SPECTACLE

STRAIGHT LINES
Finding focus through fear, celebrating a satisfactory tour and, in the social-media age, what's the proper ethic for keeping sacred terrain secret?

BLOWN IN

THE WILDEST WEST
The Centennial Mountains along Idaho and Montana's border are among the West's most critical wildlife corridors. And while the area holds ample wild ski terrain, it's also home to countless controversies that put it all at risk.

THAT GUY: THE UNINTENTIONAL SKI BUM
Félix Savard-Côté never dreamed of being a skier. Now, from his home in Québec's Chic-Choc Mountains, it's all he's dreaming of.

WISDOM: FEARLESSLY FEMALE
After a long career reaching high altitudes as the only woman on numerous expeditions, Jan Reynolds shares her insight.

MOUNTAIN SKILLS: MAKE GEAR LAST

MOUNTAIN ACCOUNT: MENTAL JOURNEYS

GEARBOX
Dissecting Salomon and Atomic's new Shift binding, sustainable jackets and accessories and six safety essentials.

ON LOCATION

BURNIE'S BLISS
British Columbia's northwestern-most touring lodge, a 20-minute flight southwest of Smithers, offers cross-cultural lessons even deeper than its springtime snowfall.

BLOWN OUT

LETTERS
Skimo requests and the search for snow.

DEPTH: SKID ROAD

LOCAL LEGEND: HARDY AVERY

LAST COL: MT. MANSFIELD, VT.

BIFF AMERICA: HOW DO YOU LIKE ME NOW?

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